Nutritional Articles

Fermentation patterns of small-bale silage and haylage produced as a feed for horses.

Published: 2005-10-05

Brief content of the article
The author conducted two experiments in which the fermentation quality of small-bale silage and haylage for feeding to horses in Sweden, and using a conventional high-density hay baler was studied. The following factors were studied: the use of additives, the influence of dry-matter (DM) content of wilted herbage and the effect of number of stretch film layers on fermentation pattern and aerobic stability. All silages and haylages were made from predominantly Timothy swards and were well fermented as indicated by low levels of ammonia and butyric acid. Values of pH were higher and concentrations of organic acids were lower in haylages than in the silages. The author wrote that this was not considered to be indicative of a poor fermentation in the haylage but of a restricted fermentation due to the high DM content of the herbage. The tested additives enhanced aerobic storage stability because of inhibition of mould growth. The only statistically significant effect of varying the number of stretch film layers was a higher content of CO2 inside the bales when ten layers of stretch film were applied compared with six layers. A full abstract can be found on http:www.pubmed.com
Keywords: silage; haylage; bales; fermentation; roughage.

Reference
Muller, C.E. 2005. Fermentation patterns of small-bale silage and haylage produced as a feed for horses. Grass and Forage Science 60: 109-118.

Website and publisher
http://www.blackwell.de